Air

Air:

Diane Dawber:

 

STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY

 

(Note: Scientific American reported in 1997, a study that showed that indoor air quality was much worse than anything outside.)
1.Smokers either quit, or go outdoors.

 

2. Remove all scented products, including personal care (perfume, cologne, aftershave, deodorant, shampoo, conditioner, soap, lotions, or make-up) and household cleaning (detergents, fabric softeners, sprays, polishes, disinfectants, air fresheners, candles, etc.) Go for unscented personal products and for non-toxic household products with low volatility. Baking soda, vinegar, and household peroxide for disinfecting, Borax, and safer detergents such as Shaklee's Basic H and Basic L will do what is necessary, probably with less expense.

 

3. Remove as many stored chemicals from the house as possible. Old paint, varnish, and other renovation products do send chemicals into your household air.

 

4. If you have carpets, have them steam cleaned by a company who knows about using no or nonvolatile chemicals, e.g., Steamatic is a pioneer in this. If you have carpets, the carpets themselves may be emitting chemicals, depending on their material. For sure, any carpet will have dirt, mould, dust mites, and residues of outdoor chemicals, unless there is a strict household rule to remove shoes at the door. The ultimate goal would be to remove carpets in favour of non-toxic smooth flooring. When having home renovations done, be sure to insist on the least toxic approach. You will be doing the workmen a favour too.

 

5. If you have pets, fleas sprays, flea collars, and other pet products may be introducing another chemical load into your indoor air. For sure, pets will be bringing in material from outside as well as producing hair, dander, etc. Indoor plants may also be a problem for some, because of fertilizers, pesticides, or mould.

 

6. Air filters may be prescribed by doctors and listed as a medical expense for income tax purposes. Change or clean your furnace or air conditioner filters frequently.

 

7.Do not use chemicals on your lawn or garden, because these will inevitably be tracked into your house. There are more non-toxic alternatives and ideas all the time.

 

8.Last, but not least, your heating system may be polluting your indoor air too. Oil furnaces emit a small puff of fumes each time they come on. Gas furnaces are less so, but there is still some residue. Wood furnaces emit smoke too. Electric furnaces have the least polluting effect on your indoor air quality, but there are other considerations with them. If you begin to feel less well, when the heat comes on in the fall, then you may have to think about this. The heating ducts are another source of pollutants and dust, mould, dust mites, and, if the ducts have been cleaned, there may have been chemicals used. Ultraviolet filters are available to kill bacteria before they enter the duct
system.

Current Board Members 

Diane Dawber, Chair

Sheena Bromstein, Social Media

Adrienne Frandsen, Business

Lynda Snider, Treasurer and Production

Christine Connolly, Business

 

Founder, Diane Dawber, BA, MEd

A teacher and consultant for 25 years until disabled by illness. She has been a published author since 1984 with subsequently 7 books of poetry for adults and children (Borealis Press, Quarry Press, and Hidden Brook Press,) and 5 nonfiction -- Reading to Heal: an annotated bibliography of the best books on alternative and complementary medicine (Quarry Press, 1999;) Lifting the Bull: Overcoming Fibromyalgia, Chronic Back Pain and Environmental Illness (Quarry Press, 1999), and the workbook, rotation diet book and Nutrient Scent Test books for Health Pursuits.

 

Featured Products

Disclaimer

As with any health-related strategy, you should consult your medical practitioner for individual guidance. Health Pursuits Reading & Research:

MEND offers only education in researching the alternatives for better health in shortertime. Information provided on the web site, in newsletters, on Facebook, atmeetings, or in other Health Pursuits publications, does not constitute health careadvice in general, or for any individual.